[Solution]Topic: Short Answers& Professional Reflection

Task Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge and application of Aboriginal education in an early childhood setting. They will then professionally reflect on how…

Task
Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge and application of Aboriginal education in an early childhood setting. They will then professionally reflect on how the subject can influence their own practice of Aboriginal Education in an early childhood setting. Each part should be approximately 500 words in length.

PART A – Aboriginal Perspectives in Early Childhood (500 words)

Develop an Aboriginal perspective activity that can be utilised in an early childhood setting. You are to develop one 20 – 60 minute activity that teaches the children a culturally appropriate Aboriginal concept. This may include (but is not limited to) Aboriginal concepts of Dreaming, lore, values, food, shelter, animals, plants, language, community people, pedagogy, songs, dance and artists. You will need to identify the Aboriginal perspective, targeted age group and one related EYLF outcome. This activity needs to be different from the ones submitted onto our Module 3 discussion thread.

PART B – Aboriginal Pedagogy in Early Childhood (500 words)

Select one of the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning; story sharing, community links, deconstruct/reconstruct, non-linear, land links, symbols & images, non-verbal or learning maps. Identify what it is and why it is a useful strategy in the early childhood setting for all learners. You will need to select a different strategy from the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning to the one you selected for the Module 4 discussion thread.

PART C – Aboriginal Community Resourcing in Early Childhood (500 words)

Select an Aboriginal community organisation or group from the list you developed for the Module 5 discussion thread. Describe the purpose and role of the selected Aboriginal community organisation or group. Suggest one way you can utilise them in the early childhood setting. They may be utilised to (but not limited to) plan, implement or develop Aboriginal perspectives or inform early childhood staff members about Aboriginal education with professional development.

PART D – Professional Reflection (500 words)

Students will describe how this subject has influenced their practice in an early childhood setting. You will need to select an aspect of this subject; it may include topics, readings, further research or resources that have been shared through the subject interact site. The professional practice that has been influenced can include (but not limited to) one of the following; planning, implementing Aboriginal education, addressing Aboriginal student learning needs, community partnerships or developing Aboriginal perspectives.

Rationale
Aboriginal education is holistic, in that it includes many factors from the classroom, pedagogy, policy and community. This assessment task allows the students to explore specific aspects of Aboriginal Education and relate it to their (or a) teaching environment.

The authenticity of this task will be evident in your future education settings by

Developing appropriate Aboriginal Education perspectives for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children;
Utilising pedagogy that enhances Aboriginal Education content and processes in the Early Childhood sector;
Resourcing Aboriginal community partnerships to enhance the educational experience for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students; and
Identifying and professionally reflecting on how your practice can incorporate Aboriginal Education.

This task reflects the following subject learning outcomes (LO) and modules

LO 2 – Have developed an awareness and understanding of culturally appropriate pedagogy for Indigenous children;
LO 3 – Be able to formulate culturally appropriate teaching strategies for Indigenous children;
Module 3 – Incorporating Aboriginal Studies and Aboriginal Perspectives;
Module 4 – Students in Aboriginal Education; and
Module 5 – Community Partnerships.

Marking criteria
Each PART of this assessment item relates directly to one marking criteria. In addition, there is a marking criteria on the academic quality of the assessment.

• PART A – Students develop an appropriate Aboriginal Perspective activity that focuses on cultural knowledge, for an early childhood setting.
• PART B – Students demonstrate their understanding of one Aboriginal pedagogy strategy and explain how it can benefit all learners in an early childhood setting.
• PART C – Students will explore the purpose and possible role of one Aboriginal community organisation or group in an early childhood setting
• PART D – Students will reflect on how the subject experience can influence education practices in an early childhood setting.
• Quality of written component – Academic Literacy Components (see rubric)

Marking Criteria
Student Feedback
HIGH DISTINCTION
42-50
DISTINCTION
38-41
CREDIT
33-37
PASS
25-32
FAIL
0-25
PART A (11 marks)

Students develop an appropriate Aboriginal Perspective activity that focuses on cultural knowledge, for an early childhood setting.

An innovative and meaningful Aboriginal perspective activity is developed for an early childhood setting that will engage children and encourage deep learning of an Aboriginal concept. The relationship between Aboriginal Education, EYLF, needs of the learner and the EC sector are explored with clarity and precision
An Aboriginal perspective activity is developed for an early childhood setting that engages children and demonstrates how the child can display appropriate Aboriginal knowledge concepts to others. They begin to analysis how the activity is reflective of EYLF and Aboriginal Education.
A creative and unique Aboriginal perspective activity is developed. The Aboriginal cultural knowledge is identified and clearly links to the activity. They are able to demonstrate how the Aboriginal perspective activity is reflective in EYLF and relevant in an early childhood setting.
A basic Aboriginal perspective activity is developed that can be delivered in an early childhood setting. They are able to identify how the activity reflects EYLF principles, practices or outcomes.
Students may identify an Aboriginal perspective activity, but its application in an early childhood setting and reflective of EYLF needs further development and clarity.
PART B (11 marks)

Students demonstrate their understanding of one Aboriginal pedagogy strategy and explain how it can benefit all learners in an early childhood setting.

The exploration of one Aboriginal 8 ways of learning is concise and clearly analyses its benefits for the early childhood learner (0-5yrs). Further research is evident as they examine the relationship between EYLF, Aboriginal pedagogy, the needs of the learner and the EC setting.
Students use further research to explore one strategy from the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning. They have demonstrated a clear examination of its relationship to the needs of an early childhood learner and links to EYLF.
Students articulate how a strategy from the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning pedagogy is relevant to the needs of all early childhood learners and promotes the relationship between Aboriginal Education and EYLF. They have utilised further research to support their work.
Students identify and discuss one of the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning pedagogy strategies. They are able to articulate a basic understanding of why it should be applied to the early childhood setting for the benefit of all learners, with links to EYLF. They have used the provided readings to further support their discussion.
Students may identify one of the Aboriginal 8 Ways of Learning pedagogy strategies, but are unable to articulate a clear understanding of its relevance to the needs of early childhood learners or EYLF.
PART C (11 marks)

Students will explore the purpose and possible role of one Aboriginal community organisation or group in an early childhood setting

Students clearly demonstrate with a fluent analysis of how an Aboriginal community organisation is relevant to the development and needs of the learner, EYLF and Aboriginal Education in an early childhood setting. Further research is distinctly linked to support their analysis.

Students examine the role of one Aboriginal community organisation or group and develop an innovative strategy to include them in an early childhood setting. They utilise further research to analyse the practice and benefits of Aboriginal community partnerships in an early childhood setting.
Students clearly articulate the role of one Aboriginal community group or organisation and provide a purposeful avenue for interaction with the early childhood setting. The benefits of a partnership between an Aboriginal organisation and early childhood settings are explored with further research.
Students identify the role of one Aboriginal community organisation or group and how they can be utilised in an early childhood setting. They have utilised suggested research to support their description.
Students may identify one Aboriginal community organisation, but have difficulty in clearly articulating its role and how they can be utilised in an early childhood setting.
PART D – (11 marks)

Students will reflect on how the subject experience can influence education practices in an early childhood setting.

Students provide a professional reflection that distinguish and analyses the relationship of professional development and professional practice with Aboriginal education. This is demonstrated with clear and concise links to their subject experience and further research.
Students provide a detailed professional reflection that highlights the importance of Aboriginal Education in an early childhood setting and clearly links this to their subject experience, supported by further research
Students express a detailed professional reflection identifying how the subject experience has influenced their own professional practice. It is supported with further research. There is evidence of analysis in their discussions.
Students identify and explore how and why this subject can influence their practice. They are able to utilise research to support their understandings of the influence and practice.
Students identify that the subject can influence professional practice, but are unable to discuss in relevant detail why or how.
Quality of written component (6 marks)

The development of themes, sentence structures, content and vocabularyExtensive, correctly referenced, literature cited in support of the analysis and critical reflection.

Skilfully crafted logical structure which provides strong evidence of knowledge, enthusiasm and control. Cites highly relevant texts and demonstrates sustained accuracy with APA6 in-text citations & reference list.
Individual paragraphs are crafted to allow thorough exploration of key ideas. Structure flows and follows a sequence which connects ideas. Cites relevant texts which are properly APA6 referenced (in-text citations & reference list).
Written expression conveys intended meaning. Uses language which respects diverse peoples & cultures. Logical & consistent structure. Cites appropriate texts which are adequately APA6 referenced (in-text citations & reference list).
Some statements require elaboration &/or clarification. Use of culturally appropriate language. Some evidence of structure. Cites at least 5 texts which are APA6 referenced (in-text citations & reference list).
Use of informal colloquial language. Use of culturally inappropriate terminology. Little apparent structure. Inadequate APA6 citation and referencing (in-text citations & reference list).Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, 2nd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Chap 10 – Teaching Aboriginal Perspectives.
Anderson, G (2010). Introducing Wiradjuri Language in Parkes. In ‘Re-awakening languages : theory and practice in the revitalisation of Australia’s Indigenous languages’ edited by John Hobson, Kevin Lowe, Susan Poetsch and Michael Walsh, pages 67-74. Sydney : Sydney University Press. https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/bitstream/2123/6912/1/RAL-chapter-5.pdf

Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. pp 53-69 Chap 3 – Teaching about the Stolen Generation

Hocking, D. (2012). From Gumnuts and Buttons. Practically Primary, Vol 17, No 2 pp16-18. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=191620;res=AEIPT

Miller, M. (2011). Embedding Indigenous Perspectives in the Early Childhood Curriculum. Educating Young Children – Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood, Vol. 17, No. 2. pp37-39. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/documentSummary;dn=330022482349125;res=IELHSS

Rose, D. (2016). Teaching Reading and Writing to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children. In Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. pp 136-167Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Chap 4 – Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. pp 70-99

Merrotsy, P. (2016) Chap 5 – Teaching talented Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student. pp 100-117. In Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press

8 Aboriginal Ways of Learning, https://8ways.wikispaces.com

Dockett, S., Perry, B., Kearney, E. (2011) The Best Start To Life. Professional Educator. Pp 25-26. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=187538;res=AEIPT

Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education. 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. pp118-135. Chap 6 – Classroom management.

Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and learning in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education. 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. pp 168-192. Chap 8 – The role of a student’s first language in the classroom.

Kitson, R. & Bowes, J. (2010) Incorporating Indigenous Ways of Knowing in Early Education for Indigenous Children. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood. Vol 35 No 4 pp81-89. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=185301;res=AEIPT

Nelson, A. & Hay, P.J. (2010) “I Don’t Want to Grow Up and Not Be Smart”: Urban Indigenous Young People’s Perceptions of School. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. Vol 39. Pp54-64. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/documentSummary;dn=633615169249111;res=IELIND
Harrison – Chaps 4 – I selected this chapter from the prescribed text because they can offer you various strategies into working with Aboriginal children and then relating these experiences back to quality teaching.

Harrison – Chap 6 – I selected this chapter here because of the discussions around classroom management. In my experiences when I developed a relationship with the families and communities, my strategies in classroom management evolved into ones that reflected the needs of the students and was in partnership with their families.

Harrison – Chap 8 – This chapter looks at Aboriginal English and Aboriginal languages in the classroom. There is much research done on this issue.

8 Aboriginal Ways – I selected this website because it is a wealth of information. Firstly it provides an introduction into an Aboriginal pedagogy that can be utilised for all students in a variety of situations. In particular, the Draft Report for DET on Indigenous Research Project conducted by Tyson Yunkaporta, Aboriginal Education Consultant, in Western NSW Region Schools, 2007-2009; Aboriginal Pedagogies at the Cultural Interface. Even though this is a lengthy research report, it provides very clear foundations for developing and maintaining the following eight Aboriginal Pedagogies; Deconstruct/Reconstruct, Learning Maps, Community Links, Symbols and Images, Non-Verbal, Land Links, Story Sharing and Non-Linear. The site also provides you with examples where schools have implemented these pedagogies in the classroom and administrative roles.

Dockett, Perry & Kearney – This article will give you an introduction into the notion of engagement in relation to school readiness. It also makes some great links between community and education settings.

Kitson & Bowes – This article discusses pedagogy for Indigenous students in the early childhood setting. One of the key points is about culture and student identity in this education setting.

Nelson & Hay – I know this article is based upon research with much older students then you may be teaching, but I thought it will provide you with perspectives on student interpretations/reflections on their education. I think there are many ideas that you can explore stemming from this article.
Milgate, G (2016). Chap 9 – Building empowering partnerships between schools and communities. pp193-206. In Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Harrison, N. (2016). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal Education, 3rd Ed. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Chap 10 – Learning from Country. pp 207-218.

Board of Studies (2008) Working with Aboriginal Communities: A Guide to Community Consultation and Protocols Revised Edition https://ab-ed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf
Davis-Warra, J., Dooley, K. & Exley, B. (2011) Reflecting on the Dream Circle: Urban Indigenous Education Processes for Student and Community Empowerment. QTU Professional Magazine. Pp19-21. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=190704;res=AEIPT

Guilfoyle, A., Saggers, S., Sims, M. & Hutchins, T. (2010) Culturally Strong Childcare Programs for Indigenous Children, Families and Communities. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood. Vol 35, No 3. Pp68-76. https://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=185284;res=AEIPT

Victorian Government (2010). Balert Boorron: The Victorian Plan for Aboriginal Children and Young People (2010-2020). Victorian Government: Melbourne. https://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/govrel/Policy/thecharter/balertboorron.pdf YouTube clips for 8 Ways Learning
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