[Solution]Lesson Plan : The Power of Poetry

Materials Required: Internet accessable computers, word processing and draw programs, 8 1/2 X 14 inch paper  Activity Time: 1 to 2 weeks  Concepts Taught: Students…

Materials Required: Internet
accessable computers, word processing and draw programs, 8 1/2 X 14 inch
paper 
Activity Time: 1 to 2 weeks 
Concepts Taught: Students will
utilize the Internet to research figures of speech used in poetry and poetry
terms 

Introduction:

Students will develop literacy skills as they use the Internet to access
poetry. Students will use a range of technology to analyze, evaluate, and
interpret figurative language. The Internet and other computer applications
will be introduced and used. The teacher may wish to provide Internet sites
prior to student investigation.

Objectives:

Students will research figures of speech and poetry terms using the
Internet. 
Students will create a poetry anthology covering a list of poetry terms using a
word processing program and draw pictures on a draw program about selected
poems.
Students will copy and paste a poem found on the Internet by a particular poet.
They will use a multimedia/paint program to illustrate the poem. They will
write a paragraph explaining why a particular poem was selected and correctly
cite the Internet resource.
Students will make a mini-book incorporating skills previously taught.

Procedure:

1. Students will define the following poetry terms, give examples of
each, and copy and paste the url’s where student’s found the information.
alliteration
cinquain
couplet
metaphor
haiku
hyperbole
imagery
onomatopoeia
alliteration
limerick
free verse
personification
nursery rhyme

2. Students will create a poetry anthology with the terms. The poems must
be copied and 
pasted into a word processing document giving the url and correctly citing the
work. Students will illustrate each poem.

3. Students will create a folded mini-book. This is done in a draw
program and incorporates previously taught skills. Students will create their
own poems to use in the folded mini-book.

Evaluation: Students will be graded using a rubric that indicates to
what degree of success the students were able to correctly complete the
anthology and folded mini-book.

If you would like directions for the folded mini-book or need more
details, please e-mail me.

4- At least one lesson must utilise
cooperative learning.

Grade

Preschool

Subject

Math

Number Sense

Numbers 0-10

Counting Numbers 1-10

Addition

Addition and Patterns of 1 More

Materials and Preparation

10 Apples Up On Top

10 Apples Up on Top set attachment

You may include student’s pictures on each page, or simply paste
their picture on the last page and cut previous pages above area where photo is
visible (this is most helpful for individual books)

Red bingo dabber or red ink pad

Bingo chips or counters, 10 per student

Related Books and/or Media

GAME: Speed Counting 1-10

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to represent putting together and addition
concepts by adding 1 to previous numbers up to at least 10.

Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

Read 10 Apples Up On Top!

Advise students to note the concept of addition by noticing
“1 more” when it is mentioned in the story.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

Draw a face on the board.

Have students count along as you add an apple shape one at a
time.

Label the apples from 1-10 as you go.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (5 minutes)

Have your students add by 1 with bingo chips or counters as you
add by 1 as a group.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

Tell your students you will be making a book. At this point you
will either provide your students with the template packet individually or work
on a class book as a group.

Use the Bingo dabber or students’ fingerprints from the ink pad
to add the corresponding amount of “apples” for each subsequent
number.

If creating a class book, you may have the students follow along
with their bingo chips or counters.

Extend

Differentiation

Enrichment: For advanced students, they may be able to work
independently or label the number on the page.

Support: For students who require support, you may use hand over
hand assistance, pair them with a student with a stronger grasp of the concept,
or provide them with manipulatives to aid the addition process.

2

Part 2

Write a 1,500 word discussion
about how you, as a teaching assistant, could help to implement the mini-unit.

Independent
Working Time (10 minutes)


Tell your students you will be making a book. At this point you will either
provide your students with the template packet individually or work on a class
book as a group.


Use the Bingo dabber or students’ fingerprints from the ink pad to add the
corresponding amount of “apples” for each subsequent number.


If creating a class book, you may have the students follow along with their
bingo chips or counters


Use strategies that encourage independent learning. Things to avoid include
high use of closed questions and over-prompting or ‘spoon-feeding’; strategies
encouraged include helping students take ownership of a task by giving the
least amount of help first, and helping them feel comfortable taking risks with
their learning.


When you’re planning a lesson or unit of work, one of the things you’ll be
thinking about is how to make the best use of the resources available. Aside
from educational equipment, this also includes expertise in the shape of
teacher aides and other classroom support staff.


Engage in real-world problem-solving and design tangible solutions, creating a
purpose and motivation to learn.


I would also divide the children in a small groups of 4’s. Get their ideas in
the topics.

1.
Don’t tell the student “slow down” or “ just relax.”

2.
Don’t complete words for the student or talk for him or her.

3.
Help all members of the class learn to take turns talking and listening. All
students — and especially those who stutter — find it much easier to talk when
there are few interruptions and they have the listener’s attention.

4.
Expect the same quality and quantity of work from the student who stutters as
the one who doesn’t.

5.
Speak with the student in an unhurried way, pausing frequently.

6.
Convey that you are listening to the content of the message, not how it is
said.

7.
Have a one-on-one conversation with the student who stutters about needed
accommodations in the classroom. Respect the student’s needs, but do not be
enabling.

•              Carry out speaking and listening
observations of the whole class or targeted children.

•              Read/introduce the lesson starter.

•              Be a partner to a child.

•              Set up reading records/journals

•              Ensure resources that are needed
for the lesson are available in order to support targeted children.

•              Further differentiate materials/resources
to enable SEN children to achieve lesson objective.

•              Support children to aid their
understanding/answering of oral questions.

•              Guide/support children through the
reading/explanation of a text/worksheet.

•              Record children’s assessments.

•              Collect, record and mark homework
and mark tests

•              Prepare review information for
parental meetings.

In
the main part of the lesson, TA’s should:

•              Take a proactive role and use
initiative within the classroom.

•              Support/aid/track the learning of
statemented children and those on School Action and School Action Plus.

•              Implement action written in IEP’s
and support staff through discussion of children’s individuals needs with
regard to their IEP’s

•              Further
adapt/differentiate/extend/modify specific tasks/activities for SEN children in
order for them to achieve success and meet their needs.

•              Test identified children in order
to provide evidence of progress: reading, spelling, phonic, memory test etc…

•              Support a group of statemented/SEN
registered children to achieve the task/objective set.

•              Support/adapt the curriculum to
meet the needs of SEN child.

•              Teach/support children to achieve
their IEP objectives or Speech/Language Therapy targets.

•              Lead/deliver specific teacher
directed activities/programmes of work with SEN children.
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