[Solution]Cross Cultural Managament

ASSESSMENT BRIEF: Summative Assessment Submission date: 24/04/20…. This is in two parts. Podcast & Script 50% Group podcast and written script which responds to a…

ASSESSMENT BRIEF: Summative Assessment Submission date: 24/04/20…. This is in two parts.

Podcast & Script 50%
Group podcast and written script which responds to a range of CCM issues in a single case study. The marks will be awarded for both elements of the assessment. The script will be submitted via Turnitin. The podcast audio file will be submitted online. If the podcast is not submitted the written element will not be marked and a mark of 0% will be recorded for this part of the assessment.
The case study describes an organisation that is experiencing some problems. Your group should address some of these problems by relating them to a minimum of three to a maximum of five topics that have been covered in lectures. The group should choose a minimum of one topic from each of the three categories listed below (maximum 5 topics altogether) and apply them to the selected problems that you have found in the case study.
The topics are:
1- Category One
 National Culture
 Organisational Culture
2- Category Two
 Leadership
 Communication and Negotiation
 Organisational Structure
 Diversity
3- Category three
 Motivation and HRM
 Ethics and CSR
In the scripted podcast your group will describe the problems in the case study, use theories to analyse them and make specific recommendations for possible solutions.
You will work in groups of 4 or 5 to produce the podcast and accompanying script. This podcast will present your group’s analysis and recommendations. It will include approximately 2 minutes of spoken input from each group member. It will receive a group mark where all members of the group receive the same mark, which is 50% of the assessment for the course. You must submit the script of the podcast as well as the audio file.
 Reflective Report 50%
Additionally, you will write a reflective report – maximum 1250 words.
The report will identify the sources used to support the argument of the podcast, including references in Harvard style. You should discuss how you applied the theory or theories that you chose to one of the issues you identified in your podcast. It will also include a short analysis of what went well in the group task and what could be improved if you were to be involved in a similar task in the future. The report receives an individual mark, which is 50% of the course assessment
Students will be allocated to their groups by tutors in the first 2 weeks.
All assessments will be carried out by tutors.
Resit Assignment Details

Resit submission date: TBC

For students who are offered a resit you are required to improve and resubmit your original work as well as adding a further reflective commentary discussing what you have learned from the process. You must resubmit your work using the specific resit Turnitin link on Moodle. The resit will be in the form of an individual reflective report. You should take into consideration the feedback given to you by your tutor both from the group podcast and reflective report and write an individual 2500 word reflective report.

You should:

Review your previously submitted work and read carefully the feedback given by the marker.Use this feedback to help you revisit and rewrite your work, improving it in the areas identified as weak in the original marking processInclude with your resubmission an additional reflective piece (up to 500 words) on what you understand was weak, how you set about addressing this and what you have learned from this that may help you with further assignments. You should address the following specifically:
i) Identify tutor feedback points on your original work and identify where/how the resit work has changed (give page number) in response to feedback
ii) Identify the lessons you have learnt from doing the resit
iii) Reflect on how your feedback and this process will help you improve future assignments

CASE STUDY:
Charles Martin in Uganda what to do when a manager “goes native”
James Green, vice president at US based Hydro Generation (HG), pondered a specific question: should he return Charles Martin for the operation phase of a major dam project in Uganda? (See map 2.5 for the location of the dam project and Uganda in Africa). Martin had already completed his assignments on the preliminary and construction phases of the project and the results had been highly satisfactory – he had finished every task on time and within budget.
Green, however, was a little concerned with the means by which Martin tended to achieve his ends. In Green’s opinion, Martin was too eager to accommodate Ugandan ways of doing business, some of which ran counter both to HG’s organisational culture and to its usual methods of operation in foreign environments. In particular, Green worried that some of Martin’s actions might have unforeseen repercussions for the company’s projects in Uganda.

He also knew the philosophy and values of the founders and the current CEO, Lawrence Lovell, who had been instrumental in shaping HG’s mission and culture. A devout Christian and a regular attendee of the National Prayer Breakfast, Lovell believed strongly that business activities, though secular, should embody Christian values. Additionally, as a manager, he believed that subordinates should be given full responsibility for making and implementing decisions but that they should also be held accountable for the results.
Martin, however, wanted to stay in Uganda and HG would be hard-pressed to find someone else with his combination of professional training, experience with HG and familiarity with the host country. Martin, although only 29, had already proved effective in using his knowledge of local development issues to disarm critics of the power plant.
Hiring Martin as a project liaison specialist represented a new approach for HG. In this capacity, Martin has been given a threefold task:

To gain local support for the project by working with the both the Ugandan authorities in the capital, Kampala, and the villagers in the vicinity of the construction site.To set up an office and hire office personnel to take charge of local purchasing (including lower level hiring), clearing incoming goods through customs, securing immigration permissions for foreigners attached to the project, overseeing the logistics of getting materials from the airport in Kampala to the dam site and keeping inventory and accounting recordsTo help foreign personnel (mainly engineers) get settled and feel comfortable living and working in Uganda
Martin was also responsible for establishing an operating structure that was intended to spare incoming managers the difficulties of such mundane start-up activities as obtaining licences, installing telephones and utilities, and finding local people to hire for the wide range of jobs that would be needed. In addition, although HG is a specialised power plant (it had built plants in 16 countries and retained ownership shares in about half of them), the Uganda Project was its first African venture.
Dam construction anywhere requires huge amounts of capital, and projects often face opposition from groups acting on behalf of such local parties as the people who will need to move because of subsequent flooding. Thus, to forestall adverse publicity and, more importantly, activities that could lead to costly work stoppages. HG needed as many local allies as it could find. Getting (and keeping) these allies was another key facet of Martin’s job.
Martin, although still young by most standards, was well suited to the Ugandan Project. After High School, he had entered the University of Wisconsin, where he became fascinated with Africa through a course in its pre-colonial history. Graduating with a major in African Studies, he served with the Peace Corps in Kenya, where he worked with small business start-ups as well as making side trips to Ethiopia and Tanzania. Although he loved working in Kenya, Martin developed a disdain for the western managers and workers who isolated themselves in expatriate ghettos and congregated in the capital’s first class hotels. His own creed became “Don’t draw attention to yourself and, above all, learn and respect the culture.”
At the end of his Peace Corps stint, Martin was determined to return and work somewhere in Africa. After earning an MBA at the University of the Maryland, he took a job with HG, and when he became involved in Ugandan Project, Martin made sure his superiors knew that he wanted an African assignment.
Not surprisingly, HG saw the advantage of the someone who possessed both a home country corporate perspective and a knowledge of the host country’s economics, politics and culture. In Uganda, a country of about 25 million, English is an official language, but many people speak only an indigenous language – mainly Bantu or a Nilotic Language. Although about 2/3 of Ugandans are Christians (about evenly split between Roman Catholic and Anglicans), there are a large number of Muslims and adherents of various animistic religions.
Since gaining independence in 1962, Uganda has had a largely unhappy history. The ruthless dictatorship of Idi Amin included mass murder among its policies, and, more recently, Uganda has been forced to absorb huge numbers of refugees fleeing bloodshed in Rowanda, Zaire and Sudan. Nepotism is the norm, and the government is considered to be one of the most corrupt in the world. On the positive side, foreign companies that want to do business in Uganda are not heavily regulated, and because few people have access to electricity, the Ugandan government the strongly favoured the HG power plant project.
Now, as the construction phase of the project was coming to an end, Green reviewed Martin’s performance. Specifically, he was concerned not only about some of Martin’s business practices but also about certain aspects of his lifestyle, not the least of which was his participation in local tribal rituals. HG had no formal guidelines on the lifestyle of the expatriate managers in its employ, but the company culture tended to encourage standards of living that were consistent with the values of a prosperous international company. With what HG paid him, Martin could certainly afford to live in one of the upscale neighbourhoods that were home to most foreign managers working in and around Kampala. Martin, however, preferred a middle-class Ugandan neighbourhood and declined to frequent the places where fellow expatriates typically gathered, such as churches and clubs.
As far as Green was concerned, not only was Martin’s lifestyle inconsistent with HG culture, but his preference for isolating himself from the expatriate community also made him of little use in helping colleagues adapt to the kind of the life that would be comfortable for them in the alien environment of Uganda. To achieve the completion of the dam, foreign managers and engineers would be moving in with their families.

As for the Martin’s business-related practices, Green was ready to admit that business in Uganda usually moved at the leisurely pace. It could take months to get a phone installed, supplies delivered, or operating licence issued. Martin, however, had quickly learned that he could speed things up by handing out tips in advance. Nor could Green argue that such payments were exorbitant: in a country where per capita GDP is about $1,300 a year, people would tend to take what they could get.
It was also a fact of local life that unemployment was high and so-called job searches were generally conducted through word-of-mouth, especially from family members. Martin had developed the practice of mentioning openings to local people and then interviewing, and hiring, the relatives they recommended. In a country like Uganda, he reasoned, such family connections could come in handy. Hiring the niece of a high-ranking Customs officer could not hurt when it came to getting import clearances.
To Green, however, although such practices were both normal and legal in Ugandan business dealings, they bordered on the unethical in a US organisation. He also worried about a variety of long-term practical consequences. For instance, what if word got out that HG was paying extra for everything (and, inevitably, it would). Wouldn’t everyone start to expect bonuses for every little service?
What is worse, if word reached the higher echelons of the Ugandan government, he would probably find himself dealing with people in a position to demand large payments for such services as, say, not finding some excuse to hinder the efficient operation of the project. Not only could these payments become costly, but they might be illegal under U.S. law. What about adverse international publicity that could negatively affect HG’s operation in other countries?
Finally, Green was not comfortable with Martin’s hiring practices. He had no reason to doubt the competence of any given hiree, but nepotism comes with risks. An employee’s close connection with some government official, for example, might encourage the employee to participate more actively in the extortion process. What if a woman hired to work on import clearance decided to go into business with her uncle, the customs officer, to charge a little extra for every import approval? In addition, given Uganda’s history of political instability, there was the risk that today’s friends in high places might be tomorrow’s enemies of state.
Then there was the issue of tribal ritual. The Dam would displace about 700 villagers. In early negotiations with the Ugandan government (and before Martin’s transfer to Uganda), HG assembled a resettlement package that included the renovation of school and health centres in the new location. HG executives understood that the package, valued at a million dollars, was acceptable to the people who were affected. Shortly after Martin’s arrival, however, two tribes living close to the Bujagali Falls site of the dam proclaimed the river home to sacred spirits. One leader likened the site to the tribe’s Mecca.

As news of the claims reached the international press, worldwide support for the villagers began to grow. With permission from HG headquarters, Martin hired a specialist in African religions, who advised HG to work with the religious caretaker of the falls to find a solution. When contacted, the official caretaker revealed that, although the spirits could not be moved, they could be appeased at the right price. For the fee of $7,500, he sacrificed a sheep, two cows, four goats, and a slew of chickens, while 40 diviners prayed and danced. For the finale, blood was sprinkled on some sacred trees. Unfortunately, the Spirits were not appeased. It seems that Martin had not participated in the ceremony. So, Martin paid another fee of about $10,000 to repeat the ceremony, in which he took part, evidently appeasing the spirits.
Green was concerned about Martin’s part in the second ceremony, which he himself considered pagan and probably a sham. Granted, Martin’s participation had allowed work to continue, but Green worried that the episode might not only damage HG’s image but could also offend Uganda’s Christian majority and the many Christian missionaries in the country. On top of everything, Martin’s participation might be construed in some quarters as a mockery of tribal customs, thereby contributing to a hostile environment for HG.
Another aspect of the problem troubled Green. His superiors at head office were questioning his competence at dealing with the African operation. He had set up the original organisation there with a flat structure but some local employees had complained that it was ‘disorganised’ and ‘no one seemed to be in charge’. In fact, HG did not seem to be good at dealing with the locals in general. The turnover rate of local employees was high and no one seemed to be able to explain this. The employment contracts were devised by experts from the company’s HQ who told Green that the terms were generous compared to other local employers. It was true that Martin did seem to be good at dealing with the locals and Green was keen to be seen to be dealing with the operations problems and not making them worse.
Having thoroughly considered the Charles Martin case, James Green now had to make decision about staffing the operational phase of the project. He knew he needed to transfer a number of managers and engineers to Uganda, and he had already begun interviewing some. But, he was still left with one critical question: how much would the new expatriate benefit from the presence of an American who, like Martin, could be a valuable source of advice about Ugandan culture? And, if he had to have someone in that role, was Martin still right for the part?

MY SELF REFLECTION:
In my self-reflection I am going to talk about my group assignment and the collabo-ration between us. Our type of assessment for Cross Cultural Management was a group podcast. Our task was to produce a scripted podcast which addresses prob-lems described in a case study. The case study was given to us by our teacher in the beginning of the semester. So, we had enough time to get familiar with it. It was about an organisation that is experiencing some problems. We had to find out the problems, then to analyse them using the appropriate theories and to make recom-mendations for solutions. We were divided In groups by our teacher. I was with two other girls and a boy.
According to Tuckman’s model, the first stage of team development is forming. At this stage the team is forming, and the roles have to be allocated. As the rest of the group were feeling unconfident in the beginning, I had to step up to the leadership role. It was easy for me because I like this role. According to Belbin, my team role was the shaper. The shaper is the one who provides the needed drive to ensure that the team keeps working and doesn’t lose focus. As a leadership I had to allo-cate the roles, organize the meetings and to make sure if everything is going smoothly.
During the storming stage we started to actually work on our assignment. As a leader I started with different ideas and suggestions. I explained them how I see the things, what I think we should do. The other members of the group accepted my suggestions. But I didn’t insist that. I asked them for their opinion and suggestions. According to the assignment we had to choose two problems from the case study. Everyone started to give ideas and to explain their own viewpoints. Then we were discussing them. Of, course, we had some disagreements, but it’s normal when you are working in a group. However, we didn’t have big arguments. This fact made me happy, because we started to work as a team since the beginning.
Then, when we have already chosen the problems, was time for me to define who is responsible for what. As we already had been given topics in three different catego-ries, we had to choose minimum of three to a maximum of five topics. Also, we had to choose at least one topic from each of the categories. That’s why, I decided to use four topics all together. So, like that everyone from the group will have his own topic to work on it. I gave them the opportunity to choose which one they would like to take. As a team leader, I wanted everybody to be happy with his own part. Because I knew that only if everyone is feeling comfortable with his role, then we will achieve success.
We have met I few times before our performing. It was for me just to check how it is going. I wanted to be sure that everything is under control. At the last but one stage we were feeling ready and confident enough to perform our work. We did not have any worries or discomfort. We met at the library in our university and we recorded our work. Everything went well.
When the work was done it was such a relief for everybody, but I also would say that, there was a bit of sadness as well, leaving this team. I have been working many times in a team, but this is my favourite so far! I did not have any bad or diffi-cult moments during our studies. I felt comfortable with my leadership role. And I am really happy of the final result, because I think we achieved our settled goal.
My leadership skill is actually my biggest strength. I can easily manage a group of people. And this group assignment is one more proof of that. I also have good or-ganizational skills and time keeping. All these three in combination make the per-fect team leader. Of course, there is still a lot of more to learn, but I am working on it and improving myself.
I did not see any weaknesses in me or my colleagues. Or maybe, this could be my weakness. I always see the things from the good side. I will think about it for sure. Maybe I have to start being more realistic and less optimist. But I think nowadays you should be an optimist to live your life happily. Being a relist in this days, sur-rounded with so many bad people and things, you can easily loose your motivation to live your dream life and to follow your goals.
To be honest, I did not actually learn anything from the group during our group work. And that is just because I have work so many times in a group before that. And also, in the beginning I was thinking that I am not going to learn anything from the case study. I thought that it is going to be just an useless story. But I have learned a lot from the case study. It helped me to realise something. Now I know that the most essential thing is to respect the others. No matter the country of origin, the skin colour or the religion – we are all people and we are all equal. We are all God’s creatures and only he can judge us.
References:

Tuckman’s Forming Storming Norming Performing theory.Belbin’s Team roles.

TEACHER’S COMMENTS:
Stop

Ignoring the assesment brief as the way to pass this assessment is all there.

Start

To read the assessment brief thoroughly and take notes of the issues inherent. This is because this assessment cannot be passed if there is no indication of HOW at least a single theory was applied.

The assessment cannot be passed if there is no indication of how to reference properly

To use a proper report structure continue to self reflect on projects as it was done in this report.

I GAVE YOU ALL OF THIS INFORMATION, JUST TO HELP YOU TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT. I NEED ONLY: For students who are offered a resit you are required to improve and resubmit your original work as well as adding a further reflective commentary discussing what you have learned from the process. You must resubmit your work using the specific resit Turnitin link on Moodle. The resit will be in the form of an individual reflective report. You should take into consideration the feedback given to you by your tutor both from the group podcast and reflective report and write an individual 2500 word reflective report.

You should:

Review your previously submitted work and read carefully the feedback given by the marker.Use this feedback to help you revisit and rewrite your work, improving it in the areas identified as weak in the original marking processInclude with your resubmission an additional reflective piece (up to 500 words) on what you understand was weak, how you set about addressing this and what you have learned from this that may help you with further assignments. You should address the following specifically:
i) Identify tutor feedback points on your original work and identify where/how the resit work has changed (give page number) in response to feedback
ii) Identify the lessons you have learnt from doing the resit
iii) Reflect on how your feedback and this process will help you improve future assignments

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