[Solution]Research paper Structure

Outline– Use the following generic outline provided in the research paper assignment to develop an outline for your paper. Research paper Structure: Introductory Section– this…

Outline–
Use the following generic outline provided in the research paper assignment to develop an outline for your paper.
Research paper Structure:

Introductory Section– this section should provide context for your discussion topic. It should answer the Who? What? When? Where? Why?

What is the topic of discussion?
Who does this issue impact or affect?
Is this issue relevant today?
Where is this issue a problem?
Why should your audience care about this topic? How are they affected?

This section should also include your thesis. Use one of the guiding questions providing in the assignment description to develop your thesis.
This thesis statement can be supported by the argument made in your position paper and the research you have done in your community and your personal experience as well as, your research in our library databases.
Background– This section should provide the reader any necessary and relevant background information that helps the reader understand the topic. It may discuss the history of segregation/integration (in your community and the larger world) and what is happening now on this issue. This information can be found in books and news articles and from your primary sources. This section should not analyze. Simply provide information to help the reader understand the issue.
Body section: Organize into paragraphs. Each of the supporting points may be multiple paragraphs.

I. 1st Supporting point- Topic sentence stating a reason to support your claim. Why is Thousand Oaks a good example of the negative effects of segregation?
A. Specific example
B. Evidence form your research
II. 2nd Supporting point- Topic Sentence stating a reason to support your claim. “…………………………”
A. Specific example
B. Evidence form your research.
III. 3rd Supporting point- Topic sentence stating a reason to support your claim. “……………………..”
A. Specific example.
B. Evidence from your research.
Use as many points a needed for your argument. Each supporting point should have evidence from your research and/or personal experience to follow.
4. Conclusion section:Big picture analysis! So what? What does all of this information mean to your audience? What should your readers care?
Essay —
This paper will be an extension of your position paper. You are already thinking about and taking a position on reparations for slavery. For the final research paper, consider one of the following topics to add to your discussion:
1. Consider a solution: What would reparations for slavery and segregation look like in America? Research different ideas that have been presented and/or come up with your own.
2. Consider an alternative to reparations for slavery: What else could be done to repair past wrongs and injustice in American history? Research current efforts towards equity and anti-racism and whether or not these are making an impact.
3. Compare the experience of Blacks in America to another racialized group: What might it look like to make amends for this other group? How can America solve both of these problems, simultaneously. Research the history of Hispanics, Native Americans or Asians in this country. Consider formal and informal legal barriers that affected the lives of one of these groups. Also, consider perception. How have this group been perceived?
This paper should build on your position paper, but it should not just begin where your position paper left off. You will need a new introduction and thesis statement. Then, you can incorporate parts of your position paper where it fits into your discussion.
Students should consult credible college-level sources that provide background, facts, studies and analysis of the issue to help support a position presented on the topic. Students are required to use at least 6 outside sources. Two of these must be primary sources. Sources can include: books, articles (newspaper/magazine/journal), government documents, audio-visual sources, lectures, speeches/talks, journals, memoirs, personal interviews, etc. Please do not use websites unless they are government sites or databases that provide data on your topic.
Examples of primary sources (Also see the link to our college-library in this week’s module) Week Five: 9/13 College-Level Research:
1. Interview an elderly neighbor about his/her experience and that changing demographics in your community. What was it like then? Now? How and why have things changed? Ta-Nehisi Coates’ book is a primary source. It provides first-hand information. We call this personal testimony.
2. Facts (raw data) from the census from your local library or a government website with this data. This will provide demographic information that is not analyzed or interpreted, simply data.
3. Information on a pamphlet from your local visitors center with the history of your community/city.
4. Your own observations and personal experiences. This is only anecdotal, but it can be useful along with other information. It cannot stand alone. This is not a personal essay; it is a research paper!
All papers should be formatted using MLA formatting for both in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Papers should be double-spaced using 12 pt. font and should include appropriate pagination and margins.
Research Paper Structure:

Introduction– this section should provide context for your discussion topic. It should answer the Who? What? When? Where? Why? Questions. This section should also include your thesis. Use the guiding questions provided in the paper description to help develop your thesis. Here is an example of a thesis statement for this kind paper: Thousand Oaks is a clear example of the negative impact of segregation on a given society. This statement can be supported by the argument made in your position paper and the research you have done in your community and your personal experience.
Background– This section should provide the reader any necessary and relevant background information that helps the reader understand the topic. It may discuss the history of segregation/integration (in your community and the larger world) and what is happening now on this issue. This information can be found in books and news articles and from your primary sources. This section should not analyze. Simply provide information to help the reader understand the issue.
Body section: Organize into paragraphs.

1st Supporting point- Topic sentence stating a reason to support your claim. Why is Thousand Oaks a good example of the negative effects of segregation?
2nd Supporting point- Topic Sentence stating a reason to support your claim. “…………………………”
3rd Supporting point- Topic sentence stating a reason to support your claim. “……………………..”
Use as many points a needed for your argument. Incorporate points from your position paper into this section. You may copy and paste sections where appropriate. Also include information from your primary sources, personal experience and additional research into this body section as evidence to support your reasons.
4. Conclusion section: Big picture analysis! So what? What does all of this information mean to your audience? What should your readers care?
Grading Rubric:
Research Paper 200 pts.
Outline _______30 pts.
Clear focus (thesis)_____50pts.
Support (examples and evidence)_____ 50 pts.
Coherence _____ 20 pts.
Use of standard English_______20 pts.
Utilized 6 sources____15 pts.
Used MLA properly____ 15pts.
This assignment is worth 20% of your final grade.

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