[Solution]Use of a Broken or Risky Cryptographic Algorithm

Cryptography is one of the more difficult technical challenges of modern times. Despite a lot of effort, there are surprisingly few secure cryptographic algorithms. The…

Cryptography is one of the more difficult technical challenges of modern times. Despite a lot of effort, there are surprisingly few secure cryptographic algorithms. The rise of computing power has caused many of the older algorithms to fail under massive number-crunching attacks, attacks that used to take significant resources but are managed today on a desktop. Data Encryption Standard (DES), the gold standard for decades, is now considered obsolete, as are many other common cryptographic functions.
Even worse is when a development team decides to create their own encryption methodology. This has been tried by many teams and always ends up with the system being exploited as the algorithm is broken by hackers. This forces a redesign/re-engineering effort after the software is deployed, which is an expensive solution to a problem that should never have occurred in the first place. The solution is simple—always use approved cryptographic libraries.

A common mode of cryptographic failure revolves around the random number function. The pseudo-random function that is built into most libraries may appear random and have statistically random properties, but it is not sufficiently random for cryptographic use. Cryptographically sufficient random number functions are available in approved cryptographic libraries and should be used for all cryptographic random calculations.
Hash functions have been falling to a series of attacks. MD-5 and SHA-1 are no longer considered secure. Others will continue to fall, which has led to the SHA-3 series being developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Until the new hash functions are deployed, SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA- 512 are still available, with the number signifying the bit length of the digest. This brings up a design consideration. If the current design is to use SHA-256, it would be wise when planning data structures to plan for longer hash values, up to 512 bits, so that if the SHA function needs to be upgraded in the future, then the data structure will support the upgrade.

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